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The Trust As Part Of An Estate Plan

Wednesday, March 16th, 2016 by Lawrence Israeloff, Esq., CPA, CFP®Comments: 0

The Trust As Part Of An Estate Plan; LArry Israeloff, CPA & tax attorney, Melville NY 11747

Despite the variety of labels applied to them, all trusts are basically arrangements to hold and control property for the benefit of other people.

To the layperson, trusts can appear complicated. People often think trusts are only for the very wealthy. In reality, trusts can be useful for people of all income levels.

A trust is a legal arrangement under state law governed by a written trust agreement by which property or assets are owned in the name of one or more trustees with a fiduciary responsibility to protect and manage the property for the benefit of another person or persons. A trust divides the ownership of property into two parts: the legal title, which is in the name of trustee, and the beneficial ownership interest, which is managed by the trustee for the benefit of the beneficiaries.

A trust is created by the signing of the trust agreement by the creator (also called the grantor or the settler of the trust) and the trustee. The trust agreement specifies the duties and obligations of the trustee and how the income and principal of the trust will be distributed to the named beneficiaries. Trusts provide considerable flexibility in transferring property from one generation to another.

A trust created during the creator’s lifetime is called an “inter vivos” trust or living trust. A living trust can be either a revocable trust or an irrevocable trust. A revocable trust is a trust that can be changed or revoked by the creator. An irrevocable trust cannot be changed or revoked by the creator (although an irrevocable trust can sometimes be changed or terminated by the trustee under certain circumstances).

A trust created in a will when the creator dies is called a testamentary trust. It is a part of the creator’s estate plan. Testamentary trust is always an irrevocable trust, because the creator is not alive to change or revoke the trust.

Common Types of Trusts

Living trusts (revocable and irrevocable) and testamentary trusts can be created for many different purposes and are referred to using many different names depending on their main purpose, such as asset protection trust, charitable trust, special needs trust, credit shelter trust, bypass trust, dynasty trust, grantor trust, Crummey trust, life insurance trust, personal residence trust, and many others. Despite the variety of labels applied to them, all trusts are basically arrangements to hold and control property for the benefit of other people.

Trust As Part Of An Estate Plan is discussed in more detail  in my book “Nothing But The Truth About Estate Planning, Probate And Living Trusts”. Download your copy here: Nothing But The Truth About Estate Planning, Probate And Living Trusts by Larry Israeloff CPA & tax attorney.


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