Who Are The Parties Involved In A Trust?

estate planning, lawrence israeloff, tax attorney, cpa The person who creates a trust is called the creator, the settlor, or the grantor. The trustee is the person or persons who hold title to the trust property in their name. The trustee has a fiduciary duty to protect and manage the trust property for the benefit of the trust beneficiary. The beneficiary is the person or persons for whose benefit the trust is managed and administered. The creator of a trust can also be the trustee, the beneficiary, or both. A trustee who is not the creator can also be the beneficiary. So although the same person can occupy more than one role in a trust, each of the three roles remain separate and distinct.

The Costs Associated With Setting Up A Trust

A trust is created by signing a trust agreement with the trustee and then transferring property into the name of the trust (which is referred to as funding the trust). A trust does not exist until property is actually transferred into it, even if a trust agreement is signed. It does not take a long time to form a trust – only as long as it takes to draft and sign a trust agreement and then complete the necessary steps (usually the completion of paperwork) to transfer the property into the name of the trust. A trust can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to thousands of dollars in legal fees, depending on the complexity of the trust agreement’s terms and the type and amount of property to be transferred into the trust. “The Parties Involved In A Trust” is discussed in more detail  in my book “Nothing But The Truth About Estate Planning, Probate And Living Trusts”. Download your copy here: Nothing But The Truth About Estate Planning, Probate And Living Trusts by Larry Israeloff CPA & tax attorney.

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The Trust As Part Of An Estate Plan

The Trust As Part Of An Estate Plan; LArry Israeloff, CPA & tax attorney, Melville NY 11747

Despite the variety of labels applied to them, all trusts are basically arrangements to hold and control property for the benefit of other people.

To the layperson, trusts can appear complicated. People often think trusts are only for the very wealthy. In reality, trusts can be useful for people of all income levels.

A trust is a legal arrangement under state law governed by a written trust agreement by which property or assets are owned in the name of one or more trustees with a fiduciary responsibility to protect and manage the property for the benefit of another person or persons. A trust divides the ownership of property into two parts: the legal title, which is in the name of trustee, and the beneficial ownership interest, which is managed by the trustee for the benefit of the beneficiaries.

A trust is created by the signing of the trust agreement by the creator (also called the grantor or the settler of the trust) and the trustee. The trust agreement specifies the duties and obligations of the trustee and how the income and principal of the trust will be distributed to the named beneficiaries. Trusts provide considerable flexibility in transferring property from one generation to another.

A trust created during the creator’s lifetime is called an “inter vivos” trust or living trust. A living trust can be either a revocable trust or an irrevocable trust. A revocable trust is a trust that can be changed or revoked by the creator. An irrevocable trust cannot be changed or revoked by the creator (although an irrevocable trust can sometimes be changed or terminated by the trustee under certain circumstances).

A trust created in a will when the creator dies is called a testamentary trust. It is a part of the creator’s estate plan. Testamentary trust is always an irrevocable trust, because the creator is not alive to change or revoke the trust.

Common Types of Trusts

Living trusts (revocable and irrevocable) and testamentary trusts can be created for many different purposes and are referred to using many different names depending on their main purpose, such as asset protection trust, charitable trust, special needs trust, credit shelter trust, bypass trust, dynasty trust, grantor trust, Crummey trust, life insurance trust, personal residence trust, and many others. Despite the variety of labels applied to them, all trusts are basically arrangements to hold and control property for the benefit of other people.

Trust As Part Of An Estate Plan is discussed in more detail  in my book “Nothing But The Truth About Estate Planning, Probate And Living Trusts”. Download your copy here: Nothing But The Truth About Estate Planning, Probate And Living Trusts by Larry Israeloff CPA & tax attorney.

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